eye-rolling-intensifies



total posts: 461
updated: 84.1 hours ago

eye-rolling-intensifies
Posted: 106.1 hours ago
justins-galdrastafir: The other Vegvísir… If a manuscript source is given for the Vegvísir symbol it is usually given as coming from the Huld manuscript of 1860. Little known is that there is another source that is actually more credible than Huld. The above version is also from the 1860s, but unlike Huld is supported by other details and subsequent records. If you want further information about the above source, translation, any questions, or graphics then send an email to the address given on my website (click the “source” link given below).
eye-rolling-intensifies
Posted: 733.1 hours ago
witch333s: Collin De Plancy, shown “chatting with the Devil in the night”. wItch333s Me at 3am
eye-rolling-intensifies
Posted: 1626.2 hours ago
everett-the-mage: A Practical Guide to Herbology Lesson Three: Soothing Salves Salves are a simple yet effective way of applying the medicinal qualities of herbs. They’re the consistency of a cream at room temperature and portable for on-the-go topical application. By combining various herbal-infused oils, an individual can address a variety of ailments, from arthritis to asthma. Each salve can be customized to the individual to treat a specific illness or can be general all-heal tool in your first aid kit. Base Ingredients Herbal-infused Oils To craft a salve, you must start with herbal-infused oils as your primary base. For this, there are two components: your choice of herb(s) and your choice of carrier oil(s). Some commonly used carrier oils are olive, grapeseed, almond and safflower. At the end of this post, there will be an overview of common herbs and carrier oils so that you can make an educated decision when crafting your herbal-infused oils. Here are two basic methods of infusion: Solar Method (Folk Method) Take a sterilized jar and fill ⅓ to ½ of it with your choice of dried herbs. Cover with your carrier oil. Add around 500 IUs of vitamin E oil for every 8 oz. of carrier oil to prolong shelf life. Cap the jar tightly and place in a sunny space - either outdoors or indoors. Shake it daily. Allow the mixture to infuse for 2 to 3 weeks, or until the oil takes on the colour or aroma of the herb within. Once the oil is ready, strain using a cheesecloth and bottle into a tinted sterilized jar. Store in a cool, dark place. Slow Cooker or Stove top (Fast Method) Place your choice of dried herbs in your slow cooker or pot and cover with your carrier oil. Add around 500 IUs of vitamin E oil for every 8 oz. of carrier oil to prolong shelf life. Gently heat the herbs on very low heat (100 - 140 degrees Fahrenheit) for 1 - 5 hours until the oil takes on the colour and scent of the herb. You can cook it for longer at 100 F if you would like. Turn off heat and allow to cool. Once the oil is ready, strain using a cheesecloth and bottle into a tinted sterilized jar. Store in a cool, dark place. Do not use fresh herbs when crafting herbal-infused oils. They contain moisture and promote the growth of mold, especially if infused via solar method. Wax Waxes are frequently used in making cosmetics, body care products and salves: they help to bind and emulsify ointments and lotions. They also function as a natural hydrating ingredient and alleviate itching for those with sensitive skin. The most commonly-used wax for crafting salves is beeswax; however, vegans and those with allergies can utilize carnauba wax which is sourced from the leaves of a Brazilian palm tree. Method Once the herbal-infused oils are prepared, the process of making a salve only takes a few minutes. Here are the steps involved in the process: On low to medium heat, warm the herbal-infused oil(s) in the top of a double boiler or in a small saucepan. Add the wax. Once the wax has melted, remove from heat. If any, stir in any additional ingredients of your choice, such as essential oils. Pour into your designated container(s). Recipes Soothing lip salve 3 tbsp beeswax 3 tbsp aloe vera gel 2 tbsp oil of choice 8 drops essential oil of choice (optional) Salve for minor scrapes, bites and burns 1 ½ cups comfrey-infused oil 1 ½ tbsp coconut oil ¼ cup (55g) beeswax Healing salve 1 quart (1 litre) of oil infused with equal parts St. John’s wort, comfrey, peppermint and lavender ¼ cup (55g) beeswax Salve for backaches 1 cup ginger- and peppermint-infused oil 2 tbsp (22g) beeswax First aid salve 1 cup St. John’s wort-infused oil 2 tbsp (22g) beeswax Salve for rheumatoid arthritis 1 cup ginger- and licorice root-infused oil 2 tbsp (22g) beeswax Common Carrier Oils Almond oil, sweet: A fantastic carrier oil that contains fatty acids and vitamins A and E. It’s an effective emollient for moisturizing both skin and hair and is easily absorbed by skin. Argan oil: This is a staple in moisturizing skin and hair care products. Argan oil contains tocopherols, phenols, carotenes, squaline and fatty acids - it’s a truly luxurious oil. Evening primrose oil: Prized for its health and cosmetic benefits. Grapeseed oil: A common base for many creams and lotions - it’s the go-to carrier oil since it’s especially useful for skin types that do not absorb oils well and does not leave a greasy feeling. Olive oil: The most commonly-used oil in cosmetics and hair care. Safflower oil: A highly-moisturizing oil that soothes troubled skin. Common Herbs for Health and Wellness Aloe Vera: Excellent for treating burns, cuts and scrapes. Arnica Montana: These flowers offer strong anti-inflammatory properties. (Do not use in open or bleeding wounds. Long-term use can cause skin irritation.) Black Cohosh: Offers anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving benefits. (Do not use during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Can cause gastric discomfort in some individuals.) Blue Vervain: Relaxes the nervous system and offers reliable pain relief for rheumatism, joint pain and neuralgia. (Do not use during pregnancy.) Chamomile: Antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic. (Do not use if on blood thinners or if allergic to ragweed.) Chickweed: Wonderful for making soothing poultices to treat rashes, skin irritations, minor burns and itching. Comfrey: Alleviates pain and inflammation; works well on cuts, scrapes, insect bites, burns and rashes. (Do not use on children.) Echinacea: Antibacterial, anti-fungal and antiviral. (Do not use if you have tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, autoimmune diseases, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis or if you are allergic to ragweed.) Ginkgo Biloba: Natural antihistamine, anti-inflammatory and great for treating allergies and asthma. (Do not use if you take monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), or blood thinners.) Goldenseal: Antiviral, antibacterial and excellent for dealing with minor cuts and wounds, sinus infections, respiratory congestion, sore throats and more! (Do not use if you are pregnant, breastfeeding or if you have high blood pressure.) Mullein: Great for first-aid treatment of minor wounds, burns and insect bites. Plantain: Antimicrobial, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory; great for treating wounds, insect bites and minor aches and pains. Sage: An excellent remedy for colds and fevers, hot flashes, painful or heavy periods, rashes and sore throats. St. John’s wort: A strong antiviral; treats arthritis, fibromyalgia, muscle aches and sciatica. (Do not use if you take monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI) or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI).) Witch Hazel: An effective remedy for acne, cuts and scrapes, insect bites, minor burns and sunburns. – Images are under the Creative Commons License. Information published is from my personal grimoire and has been accumulated over the years through a variety of books and resources while residing in Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Cuba and Canada. For more information regarding salves and recipes, feel free to visit Hello Glow, Wellness Mama, The Herbal Academy and Monterey Bay Spice Company.
eye-rolling-intensifies
Posted: 2351.6 hours ago
petitepointplace: The buried seeress from Fyrkat Perhaps she gave the warriors and inhabitants of Fyrkat henbane prior to an important battle, to give them strength and courage? Sometimes very unusual archaeological finds are made. For example, there is the very strange Viking woman’s grave, which was found at the ring fortress of “Fyrkat”, near Hobro, in Denmark. Amongst the total of around 30 graves from the site, it stands out because of its unusual grave goods. It was the grave of a female, who may have been a seeress. At the time of burial the woman was dressed in fine blue and red clothes adorned with gold thread – which had royal status. She was buried, like the richest women, in the body of a horse-drawn carriage. She had been given ordinary female gifts, like spindle whorls and scissors. But there were also exotic goods from foreign parts, indicating that the woman must have been wealthy. She wore toe rings of silver, which have not been found elsewhere in Scandinavia. In addition, two bronze bowls were also found in the grave, which may have come all the way from Central Asia. Amongst the unusual objects, were a metal wand and seeds from the poisonous henbane plant. These two accessories are associated with the seeress. The most mysterious object is the metal wand. It has partially disintegrated after the long period in the ground. It consists of an iron stick with bronze fittings. This may have been a wand associated with the practice of magic – a völva’s wand or magic wand. The henbane seeds were found in a small purse. If these seeds are thrown onto a fire, a mildly hallucinogenic smoke is produced. Taken in in the right quantities, they can produce hallucinations and euphoric states. Henbane was often used by the witches of later periods. It could be used as a “witch’s salve” to produce a psychedelic effect, if the magic practitioners rubbed it into their skin. Did the woman from Fyrkat do this? In her belt buckle was white lead, which was sometimes used as an ingredient in skin ointment. Other objects in the grave add further support to the argument that the woman was a seeress. At her feet was a box containing various items, such as owl pellets, and small bird and mammal bones. Apart from these, there was a silver amulet shaped like a chair – the seid or magic chair?
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Posted: 2351.8 hours ago
petitepointplace: The Old Norse word vǫlva means “wand carrier” or “carrier of a magic staff”.
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Posted: 2376.5 hours ago
madisonsaferillustration: Ive been a bit under the weather. Here’s a poster about medicinal herbs, many of which im using now.
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Posted: 2710.1 hours ago
sceithailm: Loki by SceithAilm And after that Loki hid himself in Franang’s waterfall in the guise of a salmon, and there the gods took him. He was bound with the bowels of his son Vali, but his son Narfi was changed to a wolf. Skathi took a poison-snake and fastened it up over Loki’s face, and the poison dropped thereon. Sigyn, Loki’s wife, sat there and held a shell under the poison, but when the shell was full she bore away the poison, and meanwhile the poison dropped on Loki. Then he struggled so hard that the whole earth shook therewith; and now that is called an earthquake.
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Posted: 2710.2 hours ago
trickstersmakethisworld: Scandinavian folklore – Elves While Tolkien was heavily inspired by Nordic folklore, his ubermenschen depiction of elves is incredibly different from the one in folklore. The elves of Scandinavia are beautiful to be sure, beautiful, terrible and cruel. Like most other creatures of myth they were rarely, if ever, seen in daylight. The fair folk lived underground, in the hills and mountains and only emerged in the early mornings or late evening when the sun already set. Instead you would most likely stumble upon them in the early morning dancing over fields covered in morning dew and mist. You would hear them before you saw them, hear their music and their laughter, but if you were unlucky their music would stay in your ears forever. And then you saw them, pale, beautiful girls in white dresses twirling through mist. You would want to follow them, to join in their dance, but any human who danced with the elves would inevitably fall seriously ill and die just a short time after. Even if you never encountered the actual elves, you could probably find signs of their presence, the most common one being the ‘’fairy ring’’, a circular formation of mushrooms, left by the fair folks dancing. Most people took great care to maintain a good relationship with the elves, because they could make your and your families lives miserable if enraged. People would leave needles, coins and other trinkets for the fair folk. In fact, archaeologist has found sacrificial sites, meant for the elves, in Scandinavia that date back to the Iron Age.
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Posted: 2710.5 hours ago
irisharchaeology: These iron staffs from Gavle, Sweden and Fuldby, Denmark are thought to represent magic wands. Viking Age in date, they were most likely used by sorceresses known as Volur. These female shamans feature extensively in the Icelandic sagas and their name appears to be derived from the Old Norse for “wand carrier” or “carrier of a magic staff”. At least 40 wands are known from Scandinavia, where they are typically found in richly adorned female graves. Photo © Nationalmuseet, Denmark
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Posted: 2710.5 hours ago
hedendom: Horg “þeir er hǫrg ok hof hátimbroðo” “Shrines and temples they timbered high” - Völuspá A horg (Old Norse “hǫrgr”) is a sacrificial site or a form of altar in pre-Christian times in the Nordic countries and which roughly refers to a "stone pile". In the poem Hyndluljóð, the goddess Frøya (Freyja) speaks favorably of Ottar (Óttar) for having worshiped her so faithfully by using a horg. Frøya details that the horg is constructed of a heap of stones and that Ottar often reddened these stones with sacrificial blood in dedication to her. Snorre Sturlason states that the horg is used in the veneration of the Åsynjene (female gods). In the poem Vafþrúðnismál, it is also stated that many a horg and hov were dedicated to Njord (Njörðr). A horg is considered different to a hov (from the Old Norse hof), commonly called a “temple”. A rough simplification is that horg were for outdoor rituals and hov for indoors worship. Many modern day heathens within Scandinavia continue to use a stone set as a focal point for rituals conducted outdoors to this day.
eye-rolling-intensifies
Posted: 2761.0 hours ago
yngvi-freyr9: A 12th century depiction of a cloaked but otherwise nude woman riding a large cat at the Schleswig Cathedral in Northern Germany. Nigel Pennick states, “Indeed, during the 12th century there had been a resurgence of Freya worship, and Schleswig cathedral has on its wall a mural from that time depicting Freya riding naked on a giant cat (in the sagas we are told that she rode in a chariot pulled by cats), alongside Frigg (Odin’s wife), similarly unclad, riding on a distaff.” (A History of Pagan Europe, p. 144).
eye-rolling-intensifies
Posted: 2761.0 hours ago
yngvi-freyr9: Mural in the cathedral at Schleswig Cathedral, Germany. Nigel Pennick states that this is a 12th century mural of the goddess Frigg riding on a distaff. Other neo-pagan literature states this is the earliest depiction of a witch on a broomstick ca. 1300. For many years there was actually a minority opinion that this witch was a forgery (or re-elaboration) by a nineteenth-century restorer. Wolfang Schild, in his 2002 essay, Die zwei Schleswiger Hexlein. Einige Seufzer zu Lust und Last mit der Ikonologie, went through the evidence for this mural (and another similar image) at Schleswig and suggested 1450 as the date.
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Posted: 3960.5 hours ago
frejadottir: Please stay away from my blog(and life) if you’re neonazist, anti feminist or racist!
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Posted: 4026.2 hours ago
vanpeltfoto: I haven’t seen you in years. Is this where you live? (Photo: d.)
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Posted: 4937.0 hours ago
pazdispenser: CBC made a good documentary on adult ADHD and part of it really caught me off guard because i swear they repeated verbatim my life story for the past 3 years full programme here: http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/adhd-not-just-for-kids