guestspot

GUEST SPOT @ THE REINSTITUTE is an independent art gallery that exhibits contemporary artists within a progressive curatorial framework. Guest Spot’s focus is to create a new curatorial program that addresses current ideas of exhibiting art through...

total posts: 67
updated: 18463.6 hours ago

guestspot
Posted: 19640.9 hours ago
RURI YI Abstract Non/Binaries Friday September 2, 2016 through Saturday October 15, 2016 Opening Reception: Friday September 2, 2016 7pm-10pm Closing Reception: Saturday October 15, 2016 2pm-4pm GUEST SPOT @ THE REINSTITUTE | 1715 N. CALVERT ST | BALTIMORE MD 21202 | WWW.GUESTSPOT.ORG
guestspot
Posted: 25724.9 hours ago
Paul Gagner: A Beginner’s Guide to Home Lobotomy December 12, 2015 through February 6, 2016 Open Reception: Saturday December 12, 2015 7pm-10pm Closing Reception and Discussion: February 6, 2016 2pm-4pm Guest Spot @ The REINSTITUTE is pleased to announce the solo exhibition Beginner’s Guide to Home Lobotomy, by Brooklyn-based artist Paul Gagner. The exhibition will open on Saturday, December 12, 2015 and will be on view through Saturday February 6, 2016. The Opening Reception will take place on Saturday, December 12, 2015 from 7pm-10pm. The opening will coincide with Guest Spot’s holiday celebration, with a special evening of cocktails and light fare. The exhibition will also feature the re-release of an interview between Dr. Howard Moseley, M.D. and Paul Gagner that originally appeared in The New Yorker, with forward written by Paul D’Agostino. Modernism, the great purveyor of abstraction, has been the leading benefactor of framing the context around representationalism as a mere arbitrary system. Paul Gagner’s paintings illustrate the tension between the modern impetus to abstraction and the resistance to direct representation, while addressing the systematic approach of authoritative critique. The artist’s psyche is culled from many directions, usually resulting in a path in tandem with either school: representation or abstraction. Gagner’s ability to work between these distinct contradictions is a sign that the justifying rhetoric of modern intentions may have more to do with an authoritative bias against representationalism rather than relational analytics of the works themselves. Paul Gagner’s exhibition, A Beginner’s Guide to Home Lobotomy, encapsulates the sublime relationship between art and suffering through a whimsical narrative that outlines a fate that is all too common for artists: the self-fulfilling prophecy. The neurotic persona attributed to artists is revealed through Gagner’s disposition towards his personal estranged relationship with abstraction, which he demonstrates through a psychoanalytic perspective. Like most artistic personas, heroism has been attributed to some sort of societal ill or conflict. Gagner’s Dr. Howard Moseley, M.D. book cover paintings reflect the self-help franchise that foreshadowed the rapid decline of the middle class. The series of works serves as satiric analysis for vetting artists and their societal neuroses. While, Gagner’s relationship with Dr. Moseley can be compared to necromancy, their co-dependency is intertwined beyond an earthly bond, brought together by irony and lunacy. The relationship between art and self-affliction are historic wounds that are expressed in paint, the magnificent forms resemble the weight of seriousness that percolates behind abstraction today. Just as irony and satire run through the veins of the human condition, an authoritative bias clogs the arteries. Paul Gagner was born in 1976 in rural Wisconsin. He received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts in 2005, and his MFA from Brooklyn College in 2009. He has exhibited throughout the US including the Sheila & Richard Riggs Leidy Galleries at the Maryland Institute College of Art, the Housatonic Museum of Art and the Richmond Center for Visual Arts. In 2009, Gagner has four collages included in the Museum of Modern Art’s print collection. Paul Gagner lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. GUEST SPOT @ THE REINSTITUTE , 1715 N. Calvert St, Baltimore, MD 21202, is open Wednesdays 5 - 7pm and Saturdays 1- 4pm. For Press inquiries please contact info@guestspot.org .
#paul d’agostino #paul gagner #rod malin #Museum of Modern Art's print collection #representationalism #abstraction
guestspot
Posted: 27319.4 hours ago
JEAN ALEXANDER FRATER: PAINTING BETWEEN THE MEANS October 3, 2015 through November 14, 2015 Opening reception: October 3, 2015 7pm-10pm Hours: Saturdays 1-4pm & Wednesday 5-7pm or by appointment Location: Guest Spot @ THE REINSTITUTE, 1715 N. Calvert Street, Baltimore, MD Guest Spot @ The REINSTITUTE is pleased to announce a solo exhibition by Chicago Artist Jean Alexander Frater. The exhibition will open on Saturday, October 3, 2015 and will be on view through Saturday November 14, 2015. The Opening Reception will take place on Saturday October 3, 2015 from 7pm-10pm. Guest Spot’s doors will also be open for ALLOVER STREET, with a special evening of cocktails and light fare on Friday, October 9, 2015 7pm-10pm. An exhibition catalogue will be available featuring a forward by Steven L. Bridges, Curatorial Assistant at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (MCA). Within the current contextual framework, it’s difficult to discuss the relevance of painting. Our means to measure the world and the objects around us derive from a timeline that evades the comprehension of our technologies. While many art practices still align themselves with the act of seeing the world through painting, gravity has taken hold of the gaze. In a culture where we are wide-eyed to our screens, we have forgotten to blink, to look up, to act, and to rise to the occasion. To engage now is a benign political act, and can even be perceived as a spectacle. It’s through this lens that Jean Alexander Frater’s work presents the tension between surrender and resolution, between the means and the in-betweens. Following the construct and path of gravity is the drip. In this way, the beauty of painting exists between the balance of submission and disobedience. Jean Alexander Frater lives and works with her family in Chicago. Over the last few years, Frater has been focused exclusively on the materials and process of painting. Frater graduated with a BA in Philosophy, and received her MFA from the School of Art Institute of Chicago. Her work has been exhibited internationally in venues such as the Wexner Center for Arts in Columbus, El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, the Images Festival in Toronto, Possible Project Space in Brooklyn, the Big Screen Project in New York, the Ben-Gurion airport in Tel Aviv, and the Kulturhuset in Stockholm. Frater was a recipient the Working Artists Grant, 2014; and shortlisted for the Dave Bown Artist Competition: December 2014. In the summer and Fall of 2015, Frater’s paintings are part of two group exhibitions in Chicago: Plane Figures, at The Mission Gallery and The Annual, An Exhibition of New Chicago Art, at the Chicago Artist’s Coalition. Frater: August 28, 2015 The object of our gaze recently, has been pulled like gravity, downward. We look between our hands to a thin backlit object. Our faces aglow from a personally constructed reality, which has been both knowingly and unknowingly self-curated with each click and “like.” Our world exists not outside of the frame, but deep within it. Someone once said that a sculpture is something you bump in to when looking at a painting. Painting is sculpture; and the world outside our frame is material. No one is looking at the walls anymore. They are looking at the ground, toward the ground. Our heads are lowered our gaze is down. We are all burdened by the gravity of our gaze. We are all bowing in prayer. Bumping into each other. The truth is that most of our world has to be understood through the images we send to each other within the frame, and inside virtual space. The things we do and ideas we have are mediated and communicated in this way. It should not go without saying that the objects in this exhibition were initially presented and discussed in this way: virtually. Intentionally, I never brought them to Baltimore and Rod never saw them in Chicago. There is a gap, a space between our idea of a show and the reality of an exhibition. The paintings are about the weight of materials, and how our perception of painting has changed, because our view of the world has shifted. The world is becoming more and more weightless and immaterial. The work is physical and many of the paintings are struggling or accepting that specific material reality. Gravity propels the black paint down the canvas, and the painted surface directs or changes the quality of the black line. Canvas is stretched or bent or torn or folded around a frame and the object becomes both about how it responds to this physical manipulation, as well as how the surface image helps to change it. Ideas of background and foreground are shifted, away from the surface, to the material itself. - Jean Alexander Frater
#jean alexander frater #guest spot @ the reinstitute #steven l. bridges #ALLOVER STREET
guestspot
Posted: 28411.7 hours ago
transmitternyc: Awesome review by Michael Anthony Farley of our collaborative show with Guest Spot at the Reinstitute, Self-Organized - Aesthetics Politics of the Artist Run. in Art F City with kind words for Matthew Mahler, Julie Torres, Phillip Tomaru from Arts & Sciences Projects and Lauren Adams. (via Brooklyn to Baltimore: A Celebration of Artist-Run Spaces)
guestspot
Posted: 29383.1 hours ago
Gentrification, Two Cities, and the Artist’s Model: A Forum for Open Discussion Saturday, July 11 at 2pm – 4pm Guest Spot at The Reinstitute 1715 N Calvert St, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 Gentrification, Two Cities, and the Artist’s Model A Forum for Open Discussion Saturday, July 11, 2015 2pm – 4pm Guest Spot @ the REINSTITUTE will be hosting an open forum discussion entitled Gentrification, Two Cities, and the Artist’s Model on Saturday July 11, 2016 from 2-4pm. The talk will take place in conjunction with the closing reception for Work in Progress on in Progress Work, A Photographic Survey of Downtown Brooklyn and The Devil in the Details. The artists will be present to discuss the work and to facilitate a conversation on the positive and negative effects of practicing in diverse and evolving communities. Artist and Professor Jan Razauskas will moderate the discussion. Special guests include Baltimore artists Zoë Charlton, Catherine Borg, Jason Hughes, along with Brooklyn artist/curator Carl Gunhouse and Brooklyn photographer /publicist Jason John Wurm. We will explore the strong interplay between two key topics: (1) the revitalization of Baltimore, particularly as a hub for the arts and (2) the changing attitudes towards pursuing an arts practice in New York. Given the current state of both cities, it’s important to focus on: – What are the attributes that influence artists to stay in a place? Which attributes are the reasons for them packing up and relocated? – How is gentrification affecting artists living in different urban contexts? – How can these communities leverage their existing assets to transcend the barriers imposed by wealth and influence? – What sectors or partners – either public or private – are potential allies for arts communities? What are the benefits and drawbacks of these arrangements? We invite you to be a part of the discussion. We hope that this initiates a broader community conversation that deepens the understanding of the term gentrification and its meaning for places like Baltimore and Brooklyn. ~Special thanks to our Curatorial Intern; Taylor Shuck for help in additional research and organization. Work in Progress on in Progress Work, A Photographic Survey of Downtown Brooklyn, & The Devil in the Details May 30, 2015 through July 11, 2015 Closing Reception: Saturday July 11 , 2015 2pm-4pm
#GUESTSPOT@THEREINSTITUTE #CARLGUNHOUSE #JASONHUGHES #CATHERINEBORG #jasonjohnwurm #ZoëCharlton #JanRazauskas #Gentrification
guestspot
Posted: 30549.3 hours ago
The Devil in the Details, works by Jason Hughes May 30, 2015 through July 11, 2015 Opening Reception: Saturday May 30, 2015 7pm-10pm Hours: Saturdays 1-4pm & Wednesday 5-7pm or by appointment Jason Hughes is an interdisciplinary artist with an emphasis on sculpture, drawing, and print media. For the last several years his research has focused on the history of American economic power and its influence over cultural representation in the United States. His creative practice is quite diverse including textiles, collages, and cast sculptures from shredded currency; a series of large scale prints that are ornate abstract composites of money; and sculptural objects from appropriated street barricades used for crowd control. His work addresses issues of high and low craft, production and trade, as well as shifts in representation and the perception of value. Jason Hughes is an artist and curator based in Baltimore, MD. He received his BFA in sculpture from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2004 and attended the acclaimed AICAD New York Studio Program during the fall of 2003. He is currently a MFA candidate in the Intermedia and Digital Art program at UMBC. Hughes has exhibited his work both nationally and internationally since 2005. In 2014, his work was selected for an exhibition at Marianne Boskey Gallery curated by Mera Rubell as well as the exhibition Washington Color Abstraction at the Gabarron Foundation Carriage House Center for the Arts curated by Donald Kuspit. His artwork has been featured in the New York Times, New American Paintings, and Art in America.
#Jason Hughes #Mera Rubell #Rod Malin #Maryland Institute College #AICAD New York Studio Program #UMBC #Donald Kuspit
guestspot
Posted: 30549.3 hours ago
Work in Progress on in Progress Work, A Photographic Survey of Downtown Brooklyn, & The Devil in the Details May 30, 2015 through July 11, 2015 Opening Reception: Saturday May 30, 2015 7pm-10pm Hours: Saturdays 1-4pm & Wednesday 5-7pm or by appointment Guest Spot at THE REINSTITUTE is proud to present Work In Progress on In Progress Work, a group project exhibition by Maureen Drennan, Carl Gunhouse, Matthew Schenning, and Jason John Würm. In conjunction, Guest Spot Project Gallery will feature The Devil in the Details, a series of works by Baltimore-Based artist, Jason Hughes. Opening Saturday May 30, 2015 (7pm-10pm) the works will be on view through July 11, 2015. A discussion entitled Gentrification, Two Cities, and the Artist’s Model will examine the various roles that have been associated with artists, and will be held in conjunction with the closing on July 11, 2015, 2-4pm. Work In Progress on In Progress Work has been documenting the changing landscape of Downtown Brooklyn over the last four years, cataloging over 1,500 images to its blog. Work In Progress on In Progress Work was started by photographer Jason John Würm, a long-time resident of Fort Greene, Brooklyn. Jason routinely photographed on his daily commute through Downtown. In 2013, in hopes of documenting the changes in the neighborhood, he proposed a collaborative project with fellow photographers Matthew Schenning, Carl Gunhouse and Maureen Drennan. The other members of this collaborative reside elsewhere in Brooklyn, no more than a few miles from Würm and Downtown. The parameters of the project are to photograph whatever struck each artist’s eye, within a circumference of about a half a mile from the Fulton Mall, in the hopes that they might give collective voice to the rapid gentrification of the area. “Bringing this exhibition to gallery walls allows for something the city does not—pause. Its impermanence speaks by its very nature to the essence of the project, and allows for introspection, education, and awareness of the impact that urban renewal has on residents both new and old. The images in this catalog now serve not only as an archive, and a record, but as still frames that allow us time to examine the complexity of each frame; each moment that are such tiny fractions of the vastness that make Brooklyn the thriving place that it is.” -Rose Wind Jerome, Program Associate, The Center for Photography at Woodstock “Those images — of gleaming new apartment towers, police arrests, storefronts, street characters and interesting, only-in-the-neighborhood parking situations — take a nonideological, documentary look at life around Downtown Brooklyn, which the real estate industry has been trying to rename DoBro. ‘The gentrification story is a very sensitive topic as a whole,” Mr. Würm said. “But we hope the show conveys some sense of the environment and how things are moving along.’” -The Birth of DoBro, Photographs of a Gentrifying Downtown Brooklyn, Alan Feur /New York Times Maureen Drennan received an MFA from the School of Visual Arts in 2009 and her work has been in exhibitions in North America and Australia including the Rhode Island School of Design Museum, Chelsea Art Museum, Silvereye Gallery, Newspace Gallery, Centotto Gallery, and The Wild Project. Her images have been published in The New Yorker, ARTnews, California Sunday Magazine, as well as being featured in Photograph Magazine and The New York Times in 2011 and 2014. She has received honors from Aperture, Photo Review, PDN, Photographic Resource Center of Boston, Humble Arts, Artist as Citizen, and Camera Club of New York. She currently teaches at the International Center for Photography and LaGuardia Community College. Carl Gunhouse (b.1976) was born in Boston, Massachusetts, but he spent his formative years in suburban New Jersey. Growing up, he developed a love/hate relationship with suburbia that led to the angst familiar to most suburban youth. With this unrest came the discovery of the anger and DIY ethics of hardcore punk rock. Yearning to be part of the hardcore scene, he started photographing bands, which began his love of photography. To escape suburban New Jersey, Carl enrolled at Fordham University in New York City. While completing a BA in European History at Fordham, he discovered that photography could be something to pursue a career so he decided to simultaneously complete a BFA in Photography. After going on to earn his MA in American History from Fordham, Carl concentrated on street photography. In hopes of developing and refining his photography work, Carl completed his MFA in Photography at Yale University. Since graduating, he has found a great deal of personal satisfaction teaching as an Adjunct at Montclair State University, Cooper Union, Marymount Manhattan College, and Nassau Community College. He has also gained some renown for his straightforward writing on photography for such web sites as Searching For the Light, Lay Flat, and American Suburb X. His photography has been shown nationally and internationally. As an artist, he has produced a body of landscape and portrait photographs by driving around the United States to expose the little visual bits of America that give voice to our shared history and experience. Carl currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. Matthew Schenning is a Brooklyn based photographer originally from Baltimore, MD where he spent his youth playing in the abandoned spaces under highway overpasses. He photographs the landscape with a large format camera favoring the slow and deliberate way of working, seeking to understand his own relationship to his surroundings. Most of his work purposely avoids specific markers of place and seeks to interject a bit of humor and poetry into the imagery of the everyday. He has been included in exhibitions in the United States and Europe. His work was featured in the first edition of The Collector’s Guide to Emerging Art Photography published by the Humble Arts Foundation and most recently in the exhibition catalogue for If This Is It published by Waal-boght Press. Born in Downey, CA to parents in the US Army, Jason John Würm spent his childhood living throughout the US and Germany. He settled in New York City in 2001 to study photography and earned his BFA in Photography from SVA. Würm utilizes a documentary style of photography to record the ephemeral around America. In his belief that photography is best understood through practice, he has amassed an extensive archive of images, predominantly made in NYC and Brooklyn. His work has been exhibited nationally and published in The New York Times and The New Yorker. In 2012, Würm founded Waal-Boght Press to promote straight photography through annual publications. AN ONGOING PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEY OF DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN 2010 - 2015. ©2013 Jason John Würm, Carl Gunhouse, Matthew Schenning, Maureen Drennan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is prohibited. http://dtwnbklyn.tumblr.com
#Waal-boght Press #Carl Gunhouse #Matthew Schenning #Jason John Würm #Maureen Drennan #Rod Malin #Alan Feur /New York Times #Rose Wind Jerome
guestspot
Posted: 32912.3 hours ago
JUAN FONTANIVE Reflected Yeses (detail). Acrylic and polymer on welded aluminum. 64x80x7.5in. 2015. JUAN FONTANIVE TOGETHER PRINCIPLE February 11 – March 4, 2015 Opening Reception: Wednesday, February 11th, 6 - 9 pm We are pleased to present “Together Principle,” the first solo exhibition of Juan Fontanive at Y Gallery. The artist will present a series of new works resulting from his latest explorations on the notions of flatness and three-dimensionality after observing the self-organizing mechanisms of nature in space. The title reveals the artist’s interest in conceiving the exhibition as a whole in which the different works are arranged to be viewed with and through each other. Fontanive has been studying the efficient way nature organizes matter through space. This designing force is what models ecology – life forms interspersed throughout space. In the artist’s own words: A forest disperses its light-collecting, for instance, in high trees, mid-level bushes, grass, then low-lying moss, all to collect sun from different levels of the atmosphere - maximizing the spacial area in an efficient way. In the spirit of this designing principle, Fontanive creates seemingly flat forms or sculptures - from drawings - extended through space. The perception of these objects - thick and thin lines, black, white, and textured colors - creates a physical layout that investigates our innate way of processing visual information, ultimately related to our ability to recognize objects and movement through space. In an increasingly flat, virtual world, the exploration of our innate sensitivities to actual space and flatness— space in flatness and flatness within space—becomes vital. Various sculptures in the show were created from previous drawings the artist has translated into a three dimensional artifact. Fontanive’s expanded drawings into objects, combined with their texture suggests a flattened yet three-dimensional plane. The drawing, the object of the drawing, and their interaction with each other, bring the imagery full circle, in order to explore the aforementioned designing force - one that is ever moving forward. Most of these works are painted in thick impasto paint (a medium historically related to painting), emphasizing their connection. All the works are conceived as a unit of structures to be explored together. The “movement”— another key axis of Fontanive’s work— is also developed in the exhibition, since all of the works imply it in a way, even the movements of the viewer while interacting with the works, has been considered by the artist in his idea of creating a unique perceptual experience. Juan Fontanive was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1977. In 2004 he was granted the Desmond Drawing Prize and in 2006 he received an MA in Animation from the Royal College of Art, London. In 2010 he was shortlisted for the Jerwood Painting Prize. He has exhibited at Kinetica Museum (2006), Royal Academy of Art, London (2006), The Royal College of Art London (2006), Contemporary Art Society, London (2012),The New Museum (2013), Williamsburg Art & Historical Center, New York (2013). His work is part of important collections such as the Lodevans Collection and the Francis H Williams Collection. Download Press Release Y Gallery 165 Orchard Street New York, NY 10002 info@ygallerynewyork.com / 415 636 0760
#art #Juan Fontanive #Y Gallery #nyc
guestspot
Posted: 33004.2 hours ago
artslant: Watchlist Artist: Eric Doeringer www.artslant.com/trn/articles/show/36056
guestspot
Posted: 33321.0 hours ago
TERENCE HANNUM DECAY November 15, 2014 through January 17, 2015 (Installation Documentation) -Accompanying the exhibition an essay by Drew Daniel, Associate Professor at Johns Hopkins University and member of the experimental electronic music duo Matmos.
#Terence Hannum #Drew Daniel
guestspot
Posted: 35014.7 hours ago
TERENCE HANNUM DECAY November 15, 2014 through January 17, 2015 Opening Reception: Saturday November 15, 2014 7pm-10pm Hours: Saturdays 1-4pm & Wednesday 5-7pm or by appointment Guest Spot at THE REINSTITUTE is proud to present Decay, a solo exhibition by Terence Hannum. Opening Saturday November 15, 2014 from 7pm – 10pm, Decay will be on view through January 17, 2015. A discussion on painting and cross-practices; influences of the self-organized, will be held in conjunction with the closing on January 17, 2015, 2pm-4pm. Accompanying the exhibition will be an essay by Drew Daniel, Associate Professor at Johns Hopkins University and member of the experimental electronic music duo Matmos. Decay is a natural component of the sound envelope; it is part of our understanding of sounds from an instrument, voice, or ambient source in our environment. It is also the natural state that sound media finds itself in – decaying. The record’s surface develops scratches and pops. The Library of Congress is fighting to address CD rot. Cassette tapes accumulate hiss, warble. Moving parts fail. Terence Hannum’s new collages made from commercial cassette tape inherit the properties of paint. The physicality of cassette material adheres to a dense strata that is manipulated and peeled away, leaving behind ferric magnetic dust. It’s within this dust, in the contact between tape and tape head, that sound is captured. Hannum’s use of cassette tape acts as a parallel to current attitudes towards painting; concepts in his work regarding time, memory, and decay become fixed in a period of changing political attitudes and transformation. While the creation of magnetic tape transformed the recording process, bringing about over-dubbing, erasing and time manipulation, Hannum’s collages presents the media anew: a strata of accumulated time and sound, a decay from the mass of potentialities that once was betrothed to paint. “Like the barren mountains of e-waste or the ship-breaking yards of Chittagong, Hannum’s studio is a place where commodities go to die. But in an alchemical act of “nigredo” in which there is a generatione ex putrefactio, the waste matter of the now-dead commodity becomes re-born as art. In a familiar allegory of the move from the baroque to modernity, the smooth clarity of abstraction is achieved through the redaction of content, the reduction of information, and the foregrounding of the material surface.” Drew Daniel, Where Even the Darkness Is Something to See: Regarding Terence Hannum {excerpt} Decay will also feature Hannum’s zines and handmade artist’s books, showcasing his research into cassette culture, with elements of cassette tape j-cards, slip sheets and other ephemera. Terence Hannum is a Baltimore-based visual artist and musician who performs solo and with the avant-metal band Locrian. Hannum teaches Foundations in the Art and Visual Communication Design Department at Stevenson University. He has had solo exhibitions at Western Exhibitions (Chicago, IL), Stevenson University, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Gallery 400 at UIC (Chicago, IL) and been in group shows at TSA (Brooklyn, NY), sophiajacob (Baltimore, MD), City Ice Arts (Kansas City, MO), Jonathan Ferrara Gallery (New Orleans, LA) and more. He recently collaborated with artist Scott Treleaven to compose a soundtrack for the film Picture Yourself in a Burning Building that was commissioned by the Toronto International Film Festival. GUEST SPOT AT THE REINSTITUTE 1715 N. CALVERT STREET BALTIMORE MD 21202 WWW.GUESTSPOT.ORG
#Terence Hannum #Guest Spot @ THE REINSTITUTE #drew daniel #Rod Malin
guestspot
Posted: 35088.2 hours ago
Rob De Oude Solo Exhibition of New Works / Proximities Guest Spot at THE REINSTITUTE is proud to present Proximities, a solo exhibition of new works by Rob de Oude. In the Project Space, Alex Paik’s Paper Constructs will be on display. Both exhibits will open Saturday May 3, 2014 with the artists in attendance from 7pm to 10pm. The works will be on view through June 21, 2014. Rob de Oude / Proximities The functions of the healthy eye are predictable, reliable and efficient. Some postulate it to be the sense via which we gather upwards of 90% of our data about the world – meaning that its consistent performance is the principle criteria for our plans and decisions, from the most trivial right up matters of life and death. For all its nearly mechanical precision, however, the world presents certain phenomena that it simply cannot process without difficulty, disorientation and error. The moiré pattern is a prime example of such an exception – a notorious historical bugbear for textile designers, photographers, commercial printers, and computer programmers. When two or more patterns of similar constitution are laid over one another slightly off register, it creates a dilemma that the otherwise indefatigable eye can’t process. The result is a kind of displeasure that some characterize as pain. This particular exception to the otherwise routine rules of visual perception is the space in which Rob de Oude’s current work thrives. Pain, however metaphorical, would seem to be a dicey place for an artist to begin. Unless one is either a sado-masochist or straining to make a socio-political statement, it can be safely assumed that aesthetic or intellectual pleasure is the natural objective for such a project. But pain, harnessed and edited by an eye and hand that’s astute, constitutes a kind of visual pleasure of the most unexpected and thrilling kind – tantamount to the type of pleasure one might experience on an especially tall roller-coaster, or at a genuinely scary horror film, or while eating an impossibly hot pepper. De Oude manages to turn pain into a kind of manic exuberance – his pictures are aesthetically and emotionally challenging, but at the same time infectious, urgent, and slyly witty. The question, then, is how does de Oude affect this pain-as-pleasure conversion? The answer might be found in Ernst Gombrich’s The Sense of Order, in which the author suggests that the key to the enduring and cross-cultural appeal of pattern in art and design resides in the make-up of the mind itself. The human brain, Gombrich says, is built to solve problems – at root, the problems associated with survival. When the brain is at rest, this urge doesn’t subside, which provides a reliable explanation for the appeal of crossword puzzles and other concentration- driven activities that would upon first analysis seem at odds with the concept of leisure time. Pattern too easily understood, like a checkerboard, soon results in boredom. Chaos, while momentarily compelling, doesn’t present the active brain with a soluble problem, which in the end has the same result: boredom. Like the great arabesques of the best Islamic pattern designers, de Oude’s pictures present the viewer with something intuitively understandable as a repeating system, but the system refuses to give up its secret as to exactly what the repeating unit is, and where it begins and ends. The variety that de Oude routinely achieves in his fields means that even smaller scale pictures can be explored and revisited again and again, each time yielding new visual pleasures. De Oude’s means are deceptively simple. Two, and occasionally three colors are arranged in sets of stripes of equal width and spacing. At least one set runs parallel to two of the picture’s framing edges, and subsequent groups are overlaid slightly off of the horizontal or vertical axis. The number of sets of stripes involves minimal planning – each one is a response to the previous group. De Oude proceeds in this way until he determines the picture is finished, which is a decision that is purely intuitive and aesthetically derived. Some paintings take shape in a relatively smaller number of passes, others are more densely layered and create surprising “artifacts” – the term used for the odd, unaccountable hiccups that begin to turn up in a heavily edited Photoshop file. When the color groupings have strong value contrast, the resulting grid crackles with aggressive energy (“pain”). Closer-valued color groupings result in a more atmospheric space – the effect is chromatically lush and painterly even though the execution is hard-edged. The spatial organization created by these overlapping groups of stripes is unitary, but also filled with incident. The all-overness suggests Pollock, but the individual events that occur within de Oude’s matrix are quite different than Pollock’s loops and skeins. De Oude’s web organizes itself into smaller pattern groupings that momentarily repeat, but ultimately break down only to form new groups that set off the same false alarm. The sub-groups often seem to be melting in and out of one another, like a fade from one scene in a film to another. These phenomena are pointedly exemplified in the impressive and always shifting Proximities and Parameters from 2014: The overarching grid forms small clusters of squares (more accurately described as parallelograms) which organize themselves into four-unit groups, then nine, and occasionally into extended horizontal configurations, and, on the right side, into long verticals scrolls. The logic is relentless, and yet the picture is filled with surprise. De Oude’s fellow Dutchman Willem de Kooning once commented that the true subject of abstract painting is space. I’ve always thought this quote was a simple and wonderful antidote to the idea that abstract painting was “painting-about-nothing,” and saved one from having to rhetorically draw the contentious and subtle distinction between content and subject matter. De Oude’s pictures are above all else a paean to pictorial space. His space evinces a certain tradition in painting – from Cezanne through Cubism to Pollock – but also embraces more than a century’s worth of technology, from early half-tone printing through to the ubiquitous screens of present-day computers and handheld devices. Most interestingly, the paintings report back about the instances when all of these technologies, old and new, are not functioning exactly as planned. This report isn’t offered as a dire critique, however – quite the opposite, it shows the extent to which visual pleasure can be found in the most unlikely places. De Oude finds a quirky kind of beauty in particular corners of the dominant landscape of the 21st have always admired and painted the landscape of their own eras. The principal and compelling difference in de Oude’s landscapes, however, is that they have essentially nothing to do with nature. Paul Corio March, 2014 Rob de Oude has been educated in painting, sculpture and art history at the Hoge School voor de Kunsten in Amsterdam and SUNY Purchase, NY. De Oude has shown recently in the US, Europe and Asia, notably at: Galerie Gourvennec Ogor in Marseille, FR, Storefront Bushwick in Brooklyn, NY, McKenzie Fine Arts in New York, NY and BRIC Rotunda in Brooklyn, NY. He has participated in several art fairs in New York, Miami and Paris and has been featured a.o. in the NY Post, L Magazine, Sculpture Magazine, Artnet Magazine, NYArts Magazine, The New Criterion, Capital New York, Bushwick Daily, The James Kalm Report and Brooklyn Magazine. As a founding member, de Oude is currently co-director of Parallel Art Space in Queens, NY. He lives and paints in subsequently Brooklyn and Queens, NY.
#Rob de Oude #Rod Malin #Guest Spot @ THE REINSTITUTE #Paul Corio