kingofdales

Bleedings from the mind

total posts: 1397
updated: 2.1 hours ago

kingofdales
Posted: 2.1 hours ago
artist-rembrandt: The Beheading of John the Baptist, Rembrandt Van Rijn https://www.wikiart.org/en/rembrandt/the-beheading-of-john-the-baptist
kingofdales
Posted: 26.1 hours ago
grandegyptianmuseum: Queen Nefertari making an offering of wine, detail of a wall painting from the Tomb of Nefertari (QV66). New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, ca. 1292-1189 BC. Valley of the Queens, West Thebes.
kingofdales
Posted: 50.1 hours ago
i-nataraja: via danielwamba: Painting by Padma Prasad
kingofdales
Posted: 74.1 hours ago
wisdomoftheholyfathers: “According to the Gospel, it should be said that undoubtedly each person is given his own saving cross. This cross has grown on the soil of our heart, and it is only through this cross that we can be saved. From this it follows that if we refuse to carry our cross of obedience for no legitimate reason, we refuse to go by the way of Christ, by the saving way, and we want to invent for ourselves another way, free of labor, for attaining the Kingdom of Heaven. But this cannot be.” + St. Anatoly of Optina +
kingofdales
Posted: 98.1 hours ago
grandegyptianmuseum: Thoth, God of Learning and Patron of Scribes (slate), 36.5 x 12.1 x 1.1 cms. Late Period, 26th Dynasty, ca. 663-525 BC. Now in the Dallas Museum of Art, Texas.
kingofdales
Posted: 122.1 hours ago
archaicwonder: Neo-Assyrian Obsidian Lamaštu Demon Magic Amulet, 8th-7th Century BC See it in 360° The obverse with an incised image of the demon Lamashtu with head of a bird facing right, striding right, with an elongated body, her arms raised in a threatening posture, a seated dog to lower right in profile with comb above; a piglet in profile to lower left with spindle above; an uncertain ‘sideways-T’ symbol at top left corner and donkey’s ankle to top right; a line of cuneiform text, which translates to “Incantation.” The reverse has seven lines of cuneiform text that translates as: “Incantation, O Lamashtu, daughter of Anu, thou art great among the gods. Be conjured by the heavens and be conjured by the earth.“ In Mesopotamian mythology, Lamashtu was a female demon, monster, malevolent goddess or demigoddess who menaced women during childbirth and, if possible, kidnapped their children while they were breastfeeding. She would gnaw on their bones and suck their blood, as well as being charged with a number of other evil deeds. Lamashtu is depicted as a mythological hybrid, with a hairy body, a lioness’ head with donkey’s teeth and ears, long fingers and fingernails, and the feet of a bird with sharp talons. She is often shown standing or kneeling on a donkey, nursing a pig and a dog, and holding snakes. She thus bears some functions and resemblance to the Mesopotamian demon Lilith. Lamashtu’s father was the Sky God Anu. Unlike many other usual demonic figures and depictions in Mesopotamian lore, Lamashtu was said to act in malevolence of her own accord, rather than at the gods’ instructions. Along with this her name was written together with the cuneiform determinative indicating deity. This means she was a goddess or a demigoddess in her own right. She bore seven names and was described as seven witches in incantations. Her evil deeds included: slaying children; causing harm to mothers and expectant mothers; eating men and drinking their blood; disturbing sleep; bringing nightmares; destroying crops; infesting rivers and lakes; and being a bringer of disease, sickness, and death. Pazuzu, a god or demon, was invoked to protect birthing mothers and infants against Lamashtu’s malevolence, usually on amulets, such as this one, and statues. Although Pazuzu was said to be bringer of famine and drought, he was also invoked against evil for protection, and against plague, but he was primarily and popularly invoked against his fierce, malicious rival Lamashtu.
kingofdales
Posted: 146.1 hours ago
contemporary-art-blog: Yinka Shonibare, MBE Farnese Hercules, 2017 Stephen Friedman Gallery
kingofdales
Posted: 170.1 hours ago
flyse: Alexander III of Scotland Rescued from the Fury of a Stag by the Intrepidity of Colin Fitzgerald (‘The Death of the Stag’), Benjamin West (British-American, 1738–1820), 1786 Oil on canvas
kingofdales
Posted: 194.1 hours ago
arjuna-vallabha: Jagaddhatri, bengali school
kingofdales
Posted: 218.1 hours ago
discardingimages: climbing down Satan’s fur Dante, Divina Commedia, Urbino and Ferrara 1477-1478 Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Urb.lat.365, fol. 93v
kingofdales
Posted: 242.1 hours ago
kundst: Painter Pyke Kock meets architect Piet Blom (Overlay spatial architectural structure (1973) on the portrait of banker Jacob Mees, 1938). 2018 Pyke Koch (NL 1901-1991) Oil on canvas on panel (35 x 30 cm) Piet Blom (NL 1934-1999)
kingofdales
Posted: 266.1 hours ago
frazettamolamucho: Conan & Frank Frazetta
kingofdales
Posted: 290.1 hours ago
artist-rubens: The Prophet Elijah Receiving Bread and Water from an Angel, Peter Paul Rubens Medium: oil,canvas
kingofdales
Posted: 314.1 hours ago
maenaart: Ritual. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpiFmZLICgM
kingofdales
Posted: 338.1 hours ago
nocturnalpicnic: into the woods 2015 21x34cm michael pontieri
kingofdales
Posted: 362.1 hours ago
artist-rubens: Descent from the Cross (outside right), Peter Paul Rubens Medium: oil,panel https://www.wikiart.org/en/peter-paul-rubens/descent-from-the-cross-outside-right-1614
kingofdales
Posted: 386.1 hours ago
wisdomoftheholyfathers: St. Herman of Alaska, pray for us! Wonderworker of Alaska, as you know and as you will have mercy on us! Thank you! Thank you so much for all you’ve done for us, for all! Bless us and take good care of us sweet one of God!
kingofdales
Posted: 410.1 hours ago
renaissance-art-blog: The Torment of Saint Anthony, 1487, Michelangelo Buonarroti Size: 35x47 cm Medium: oil, panel, tempera
kingofdales
Posted: 458.1 hours ago
artist-titian: St Jerome, Titian Medium: oil,canvas https://www.wikiart.org/en/titian/st-jerome-1575