slingsandarrowroot



total posts: 692
updated: 5.4 hours ago

slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 5.4 hours ago
mapsontheweb: The highest point above Earth’s center is the peak of Ecuador’s Mount Chimborazo, located just one degree south of the Equator where Earth’s bulge is greatest.
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 113.6 hours ago
thisdiscontentedwinter: tagaston: For any of you who are writing ‘across the pond’-here is a little guide I put together of some common differences between British and American English! Seems relevant to recent discussions! Also, Australian English is often a weird mix of the two, with some of our own words thrown in just to confuse you all!
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 608.4 hours ago
saltysenpie: fuckingconversations: pazdispenser: CBC made a good documentary on adult ADHD and part of it really caught me off guard because i swear they repeated verbatim my life story for the past 3 years full programme here: http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/adhd-not-just-for-kids My ADHD manifested in excellent in-class work. Excellent understanding in discussions. Excellent participation. My ADHD manifested in piles of homework left undone until the last possible minute, while I stared at them, thinking; “I want to get these done. I understand the theory. It would take 10 minutes. I want to start, why can’t I start?” My ADHD manifested in fantastic reading comprehension - nigh impenetrable focus on interesting topics the first time I’m reading about them. My ADHD manifested in a complete inability to focus on reviews or re-reads, mind skittering sideways and away whenever anything was boring or repetitive. I sat down to study, my books open, my eyes on the text, and my brain clawing its way out the back of my head to focus on something else - anything else. Focus, focus! [No.] My ADHD manifested in Articulating wings half-finished but still beautiful, in beautiful lineart and half-hearted coloring. In stories written passionately for days until I forgot it existed and never returned. In projects started and forgotten and started and forgotten a thousand times until my bins of project supplies piled up and my bank account shriveled down. No, it will be different this time - I LOVE this new thing. This new thing is my world, my destiny, my Everything. I CREATE and CREATE and CREATE and never FINISH. My ADHD manifested in confusion and surprise as time slithered away, hours passing like minutes and minutes seeming endless by contrast. An inability to gauge how much time had passed, was left, a task would take. An inability to hold dates in my head, because time didn’t feel consistent or even real. My ADHD manifested in watching someone talk and not understanding a word they said - literally hearing sounds and translating out only nonsense. In thoughts so loud I couldn’t speak coherently. In a conversation across the room shattering an idea I was trying to hold. It’s hard to think when you’re already thinking about everything around you. @ryrythescienceguy maybe this is relevant for you ?
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 915.4 hours ago
notyourexrotic: making-a-lettuce: demigaybird: engrprof: tiny-with-a-bang: queennubian: secretlifeofateenblogger: I keep forgetting what the differences are in the over the counter pain relievers, so I made a handy chart. THANK YOU OMG!!!!!!!!!!!!!! As someone who suffers from migraines too often, this is perfect. Please share this helpful chart!! Also, tylenol is good for nerve pain, like fibromyalgia. Excedrin is also great for migraines because it contains caffeine, they have a line called Excedrin Migraine, but the original is just as effective yea i knew aleve was fuckin me up for no reason gotta switch asap Acetaminophen = Paracetamol for non-Americans.
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 1191.5 hours ago
octoswan: I made these as a way to compile all the geographical vocabulary that I thought was useful and interesting for writers. Some descriptors share categories, and some are simplified, but for the most part everything is in its proper place. Not all the words are as useable as others, and some might take tricky wording to pull off, but I hope these prove useful to all you writers out there! (save the images to zoom in on the pics)
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 1354.4 hours ago
rsbenedict: kaijutegu: roachpatrol: I WOULD PAY TEN TIMES AS MUCH FOR CHOCOLATE IF IT MEANT REDUCING THE AMOUNT OF SLAVES IN THE WORLD? HOW IS THIS ANY KIND OF PROBLEM. good news, you can! the company’s called Tony’s Chocolonely and their entire purpose is to make slave-free chocolate and reform the chocolate industry. https://tonyschocolonely.com/us/en https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony%27s_Chocolonely Whole Foods carries it. If you don’t want to support an Amazon-owned company, World Market carries it. You can also buy it directly from the company. It’s the best chocolate I’ve ever had and it’s 100% slave free. Tony’s Chocolonely works really hard to push for transparency within the chocolate industry and actually has and is following an action plan to eliminate slavery within cocoa production. They’re good people who make good chocolate. A list of slavery-free chocolate companies: Aldi Aloha Feels Chocolate Alma Chocolate Alter Eco Chocolate Amano Chocolate Askinoise Chocolate The Beach Chocolate Factory Belicious Black Mountain Chocolate Cacaoteca Caribeans Chocolate Castronovo Chocolate Charm School Chocolates Chocolate Cartel Chocolat Celeste Chocolate Tree Chocolate Troubadour Choconat Coco Chocolate Compartes Chocolates Dandelion Chocolate Dark Forest Chocolate Denman Island Chocolate Divine Chocolate Co. Eating Evolved Eat Your Hat El Ceibo The Endangered Species Equal Exchange Fairafric Forever Cocoa Fresco Chocolate Fruition Chocolate Gayleen’s Decadence GEPA Chocolate Giddy Yo Yo Grenada Chocolate Company Grocer’s Daughter Chocolate Guittard Habitual Chocolate Hagensborg Chocolates Health by Chocolate Hilo Shark Chocolate HNINA Gourmet Honest Artisan Chocolate Hooray Tuffles Ithaca Fine Chocolates L.A. Burdick Chocolates La Iguana Chocolate Lake Champlain Chocolates La Siembra Cooperative Lillie Belle Farms Madecasse Malagasy Maverick Chocolate Company Max Havelaar Mayan Monkey Mayordomo Mia Chocolate Montezuma’s Chocolates Nayah Amazon Chocolates Newman’s Own Organics Purdy’s Chocolate Omanahene Cocoa Bean Company Ombar OpuLux Fair Trade Chocolate Original Hawaiian Chocolate Parliament Chocolate Montevérgine Patric Chocolate Plamil Organic Chocolate Potomac Chocolate Pure Lovin’ Chocolate Rain Republic Rapunzel Pure Organics Ritual Chocolate Samaritan Xocolata Sappho Chocolates Seed & Bean Chocolate Shaman Chocolates Sibú Chocolate Solkiki Chocolate Sweet Earth Chocolates Sweet Impact Fudge Sweet Riot Sun Eaters Organics Taza Chocolate Terra Nostra Organic Terroir Chocolate TCHO The Chocolate Wave Theo Chocolate The Original Chocolate Bar (Houston, TX) Tobago Estate Chocolate TONY’S CHOCOLONELY Vivani Chocolate Vosges Wei of Chocolate Xocolatl Chocolate Zotter
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 1525.7 hours ago
rorykurago: motherfickle: rafawriter: atomic-darth: commandtower-solring-go: pink-squirl: Terry Crews came out and admitted he had been sexually assulted by someone in the film industry, and is now being blacklisted. I have been a fan of his since Idiocracy, and will continue to support all of his work. So when you wonder why people don’t come forward with their assults, this is why. Where are all the bitch men who ask about male sexual assault when the focus is on women but are dead silent when men are actually at the focus. It’s almost as if Men’s Rights Activists don’t really care about men’s rights. Hmmm…. 🤔 Yep…. This misses the really powerful piece of the story: Terry Crews was the one who chose not to do the movie. One of the producers told him, essentially, that he could either do the movie and be drop the sexual assault charges, or continue with the trial and have “troubles”. Terry dropped out because he felt standing against abusers was more important than his film career. It’s bullshit that he was threatened in the first place, of course, but his response was ballsy. I admire him for it. Reblog to support Terry Crews and men like him.
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 1818.8 hours ago
raptorlily: madawhatever: “Before the writers started working on the first season, I wrote a list of six things on the wall that every episode had to do.” - Mike Schur (x) #ladies and gentlemen #a showrunner who knows what the fuck he is doing (via @stillscape)
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 1858.0 hours ago
lavender-manna: zanmor: these ones oh we can get even more specific than just a list of billionaires: here are all of the scum who control oil, coal, and natural gas here are the ones who run the factories and here are the ones who extract the raw resources that the others need to make it all work
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 1861.5 hours ago
oupacademic: It’s back-to-school season once again! Today the average student will graduate with over $30,000 in student loan debt. For so many lower income students, the pressure to pay off this debt is creating long term financial strains that impact their lifetime earning potential. Researchers and policy makers are working together to propose new solutions to close the lifetime income gap between and make the American dream achievable for all. Image by Sarah Butcher for Oxford University Press
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 2240.0 hours ago
xkcds: All electromagnetic equations: The same as all fluid dynamics equations, but with the 8 and 23 replaced with the permittivity and permeability of free space, respectively. Equations [Explained] I don’t know number theory, gauge theory or quantum gravity, but the rest seems depressingly legit.
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 2338.3 hours ago
wolveswolves: Woolly wolf spotted in Nepal is likely a new species April 28, 2016 - By analyzing the animal’s poop, scientists provide more evidence it’s not a subspecies of the gray wolf. Pausing at a clearing, a sudden streak of black against the carpet of white snow moved in the corner of Madhu Chetri’s eye. It was 2004, and Chetri, now a Ph.D. student at Norway’s Hedmark University College, was trekking through the roof of the world: Nepal’s Annapurna Conservation Area. Looking up, he caught the gaze of a wolf, who regarded him with curiosity. “I was struck by these golden yellow eyes. They were so bright. I was so excited,” says Chetri, who was exploring the Upper Mustang region as part of his conservation work. The area had plenty of feral dogs, but Chetri knew right away that this big, woolly creature was no dog. It was the Himalayan wolf, which had never before been seen in Nepal. Searching for Scat Scientists first identified the Himalayan wolf (Canis lupus chanco), thought to be a subspecies of the gray wolf, about 200 years ago. It was known to live in India and Tibet, but never Nepal. Not long after Chetri saw his wolf, two studies came out that challenged the idea that the Himalayan wolf was a subspecies. At the DNA level, the studies claimed, the wolf was so different that it deserved its own species name. Chetri already had a feeling this was the case: The animal he saw was smaller and much leaner than gray wolves, which live in Europe and North America. It also had white patches on its chest and throat, which are not seen in gray wolves. And he’d always wanted to know more about the beautiful canine that had so captivated him 10 years earlier. So Chetri began to search for its most accessible DNA source: poop. He returned to Nepal and looked for wolf scat between May and September, when weather was the driest and the feces would be best preserved. Lone Wolf He managed to collect a total of six samples and could extract DNA from five of them. One of his samples was from a feral dog, leaving him with four specimens. To be consistent with the two previous studies published in 2004 and 2006, Chetri sequenced the specimens’ mitochondrial DNA, which is inherited from an animal’s mother. Working with a group of scientists from India and Nepal, Chetri extracted and sequenced the DNA in the lab. His work confirmed the two earlier studies: The Himalayan wolf was significantly different from any other wolves and is likely a distinct species. In fact, the genetic data revealed that Himalayan wolves have been distinct from other wolves for at least 800,000 years, according to the results, which were published April 21 in the journal ZooKeys. Chetri and colleagues propose that the animal be named the Himalayan wolf, although they haven’t yet proposed a formal species name. He also hopes it brings attention to the plight of the critically endangered species, which is thought to number fewer than 350 individuals. “I hope that this work will create more attention for this wolf, since there are lots of conflicts with local farmers and livestock,” Chetri says. “If farmers can help see the value of this wolf, they might be less inclined to kill it.” Surprisingly Diverse Klaus-Peter Koepfli, a conservation biologist at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, says the study is important for two major reasons. The first is the growing evidence of the Himalayan wolf as a unique species, says Koepfli, who was not involved with the research. The other is establishing that these wolves live in the Upper Mustang region. “It provides solid evidence of living wolves in the area. Even if it’s just one individual, it’s important because they’re there,” he says. “There’s a lot more biodiversity than we thought there was.” Source
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 2387.0 hours ago
did-you-kno: Because most of us spend the majority of our time indoors, NASA conducted a Clean Air Study to determine which common houseplants are the best for filtering harmful toxins like ammonia and formaldehyde from the air. **Please note: Several of these plants are known to be toxic to cats, dogs and other pets. If you are a pet owner, please do check the toxicity of plants before introducing them to your home.** Source Source 2
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 2391.5 hours ago
sosuperawesome: Cassandra Jean on Instagram and Society6 Follow So Super Awesome on Instagram
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 2554.5 hours ago
mapsontheweb: Ankh-Morpork Metro. Please note that some stations do not open except on wet Thursdays.
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 2721.4 hours ago
did-you-kno: Visiting the island of Socotra in Yemen can seem like you’re on another planet. More than 30% of the island’s plant life, including the dragon blood tree that bleeds bright red sap when it’s cut, isn’t found anywhere else on earth. Source Source 2
slingsandarrowroot
Posted: 2764.2 hours ago
poweredbyplantscr: powrd-by-plants: The global fishing fleet is 2-3 times larger than what the oceans can sustainably support. In other words, people are taking far more fish out of the ocean than can be replaced by those remaining. As a result: 53% of the world’s fisheries are fully exploited, and 32% are overexploited, depleted, or recovering from depletion. Most of the top ten marine fisheries, accounting for about 30% of all capture fisheries production, are fully exploited or overexploited. Several important commercial fish populations have declined to the point where their survival is threatened. Unless the current situation improves, stocks of all species currently fished for food are predicted to collapse by 2048. Needless slaughter It’s not just the fish we eat that are affected. Each year, billions of unwanted fish and other animals - like dolphins, marine turtles, seabirds, sharks, and corals - die due to inefficient, illegal, and destructive fishing practices. Why is this happening? Overfishing is largely due to: Poor fisheries management Pirate fishers that don’t respect fishing laws or agreements Massive bycatch of juvenile fish and other marine species Subsidies that keep too many boats on the water Unfair Fisheries Partnership Agreements that allow foreign fleets to overfish in the waters of developing countries Destructive fishing practices *