toschestationwagon

Picking up power converters since 1977

total posts: 961
updated: 16.1 hours ago

toschestationwagon
Posted: 40.1 hours ago
batlabels: wilwheaton: goodzillo: raeloganthesonic06fangirl: askarkham: It’s like someone went crazy with a label maker and I love it. How can you forget this gem?? People always act like the old Batman show being corny was a product of its time but you’re never going to get me to believe this wasn’t a deliberate artistic choice Making these signs must have been as much fun as putting them into the script. One of the greatest joys of my life was receiving a treasure trove of producer William Dozier’s memos and letters. The amount of intention, the delicate balancing act required for this kind of humour, he was so aware of it and the writers worked so hard to get it just right. The fact that they did it while also working at an absurd pace — the show debuted early, as a mid-season replacement, and was such a hit that they had to deliver season two for the September date that they were planning to deliver season one, AND they made a feature film between seasons, AND they ran twice a week in season two, a sixty episode season — is astonishing to me. They did so much so well in such a short period of time.
toschestationwagon
Posted: 92.8 hours ago
shittypostarchive: lightarios: Emma Watson by VoidShrike on DeviantArt 25/11/2019
toschestationwagon
Posted: 184.1 hours ago
sigynpenniman: as an IT person I would like to sue this screen for emotional damages
toschestationwagon
Posted: 332.8 hours ago
npr: Last winter, when Chung Soo-young saw a man rushing out of the women’s restroom at a chain coffee shop in downtown Seoul, the first thing she did was to scan all stalls in search of a hidden camera. Like many other South Korean women, Chung, 26, constantly worries that she could be secretly filmed in private moments. Her fear spiked, she says, when she saw the intruder and “realized I can actually be a victim.” In South Korea, microcameras installed in public bathrooms for surreptitious filming are an everyday concern. Police data show that the number of “illegal filming” crimes sharply increased from 1,353 in 2011 to 6,470 in 2017. The fear of digital peeping Toms has led women to stuff tiny balls of toilet paper into holes they find in public bathroom stalls or cover the holes with tape. Six months after her bathroom incident, Chung decided to act and put together her own “emergency kit” to thwart molka, or hidden cameras. She started a crowdfunding project for the kit, and the response was greater than she had expected. More than 600 people bought the kit, which costs about $12 (14,000 Korean won) and includes a tube of silicone sealant to fill up holes, an ice pick to break tiny camera lenses and stickers to patch up holes. Thinking of her kits as a “stopgap,” Chung also started building an archive of illicitly recorded videos and pictures she found online to demonstrate how serious the problem is. In September, during a search, she stumbled on a video of herself from that December day. Once filmed, molka videos are quickly shared online. With the right search words in Korean, it is not difficult to find pictures and videos of women in bathrooms and changing rooms on file-sharing platforms and social networks such as Tumblr and Twitter. Thumbnails of such videos, tagged with an estimated age of the filmed women or the filming location, are posted with a messenger ID. Anyone can contact the seller, who is often the one who shot the film, and get gigabytes of voyeuristic videos for pennies. South Korean Women Fight Back Against Spy Cams In Public Bathrooms Photo credits in captions