wagsman



total posts: 57
updated: 74.4 hours ago

wagsman
Posted: 2492.1 hours ago
memecage: Accurate chart As someone in Alaska i feel this in my soul.
wagsman
Posted: 28051.1 hours ago
slightly-bovverd: FLAWLESS KURANOSUKE THIS IS NOT A DRILL
wagsman
Posted: 29300.3 hours ago
nativeamericannews: Jackson most infamous as anti-Native American president This is in response to the recent op-eds praising the Indian killer Andrew Jackson and a plethora of articles in this paper reporting on local efforts by the newly formed Andrew Jackson Foundation to elevate him to the status of a great president.
wagsman
Posted: 29491.0 hours ago
humblepirate: femmefatalist: angrypeopleofcolorunited: HAPPY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY!!! I am here for this. 1. Kathleen Cleaver speaking at a Black Panther rally 1969 2. “Yellow Power to Yellow People” in front of the court house in Oakland, CA 1969 3. Flyer for 2011 rally to end Islamophobia (I could find a couple sources for this one, but they’re all horrifically Islamophobic, so best to take it as is) 4. Giving Thanks for 250 Years of Resistance by Melanie Cervantes 5. Hands Off Assata 6. Morning White Dove, Cherokee native 7. Activist Angela Davis, who was targeted by the government for having Communist leanings 8. Brown Berets protest 9. The Gulabi Gang, a group of Indian women who fight violence against women 10. Free Palestine protest
wagsman
Posted: 29584.9 hours ago
mindblowingscience: U of T uses electromagnets to attract girls to scienceGroups of students huddle around desks at a university campus as the instructor gives out a quick overview of the job at hand: build a crane, create an electromagnet and pick up metal. Work begins in earnest, with some of the students building their contraptions with wheels “for better transportation” while others build them for strength. But these are not university students. They are Grades 3 and 4 students — about half of them girls — who like to spend a few hours on the weekend building stuff and learning about science. “I’ve been building stuff a long time,” says 8-year-old Yashu Tenneti. “In our school, we’re building bridges out of Popsicle sticks.” Does she want to be an engineer or scientist when she grows up? “I don’t know. I want to be many things,” she says. Continue Reading.
wagsman
Posted: 29663.6 hours ago
fromquarkstoquasars: Let’s Send Kids to Science Camp! Hey guys, this is our last push to raise money for Tech Trek, a nonprofit science camp for kids. We have shirts for kids and adults (both men and women), and 100% of the money raised is going to the camp. Learn more and get yours at the link. http://teespring.com/TechTrek-fundraiser
wagsman
Posted: 29663.9 hours ago
karzahnii: a story about tumblr’s collective ability to fact check
wagsman
Posted: 29754.5 hours ago
nativeamericannews: 5 More Natives Who Should Replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 Bill In 2012, we spotlighted Andrew Jackson as our top pick for worst U.S. president—because he earned his “Indian Killer” nickname. He was a major proponent of Indian removal, his first effort was waging a war against the Creeks. The Creeks lost 23 million acres of land in Georgia and Alabama, paving the way for cotton plantation slavery. http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/02/25/5-more-natives-who-should-replace-andrew-jackson-20-bill-158803
wagsman
Posted: 30000.7 hours ago
nativeamericannews: Are Louisiana Tribes Turning a Blind Eye to Racism? The first time I set foot on the Chitimacha Indian Reservation in Louisiana was in the 1990s. Prior to this, I had seen pictures of some of their tribal members attending Indian boarding schools with members of my own tribe and many others.
wagsman
Posted: 30000.7 hours ago
peterfromtexas: MTV I’m looking at you By Ian Mutchler [tumblr | instagram | twitter] That’s how I got into anime
wagsman
Posted: 31600.0 hours ago
cerastes: kamen-rider-rahbito: meezdeez7: knightofsuperior: josukehigashikata: fashinpirate: im hollerin Miyazaki: The Problem With The Anime Industry Is It’s Full of People Who Actually Buy the Content They Consume #I’M REALLY TORN ABOUT THIS #I LOVE MIYAZAKI AND THE THINGS HE MAKES #BUT NOW I FEEL COMPLETELY INSULTED BY A PERSON I LOOK UP TO #ALSO HE IMPLIES MASTURBATION IS AS BAD AS WAR????? #WTF MIYAZAKI WHO ARE YOU #I HATE SEEING THE PERSON BEHIND THE CREATIONS SOMETIMES #THIS IS HORRIBLE AND I WISH I DIDN’T SEE IT #IT’S JUST LIKE HORRIBLESUBS AND THE SHITTY THINGS THEY SAY ABOUT THE FANS WHO WATCH THE SHOWS THEY FANSUB #JFC FUCK THE WORLD Methinks Miyazaki has spent a little too much time going bar hopping with Hideki Anno He’s the new Alan Moore. Was only a matter of time. IN WHICH I WRITE A VERY LONG POST ABOUT WHY MIYAZAKI IS NOT WRONG AND I APPARENTLY CAN’T INSERT A READ MORE BREAK SO SUCK IT IN THAT REGARD TOO, I GUESS tl;dr: If you unironically call yourself an otaku, you’re lumping yourself in with some of the least-respected members of society in Japan, and you shouldn’t be surprised/outraged when a well-respected member of Japanese society looks down on you. The things otaku like are off-putting, and because the anime industry makes most of their money from otaku, the anime industry in general is off-putting. The anime industry should probably be restructured so that otaku have less power to decide what gets animated, otherwise the anime industry will collapse because NOBODY LIKES IT. Gimme your lunch money, nerds. Uh, he never implied masturbation is as bad as war. He’s being a cranky old man, as cranky old men are wont to do. The author of the article just listed those things as additional things Miyazaki doesn’t like. And something you people really, really, REALLY need to understand is that “otaku” is not a term of endearment in Japan the way “nerd” has become so in the West. If I were to speculate, I’d say it has a lot to do with cultural values - here, we place a lot of value and pride in our individual identities, but that just is not the case in Japan. They, and the East Asian countries in general, place a lot of value in working to improve the collective. Being an otaku implies a lot of the things you’d think being the classical “nerd” implies - living in your mother’s basement, spending all your time watching anime/slacking off, and being a general drain on society. While that’s not “accepted” in the West per se, it is not directly contradictory to every cultural value we have. We’re just expressing our identities when we do those kinds of things. In Japan, they are the antithesis of a praiseworthy member of society.When the anime industry is, in Miyazaki’s mind, full of these kinds of people, who seal themselves off in insular groups and jack off to 2D waifus all day in between drawing said 2D waifus, that is a real problem. Frankly, when I look at the entire catalogue of anime titles released over the past 5 years, I see what he means. Who the fuck is going to buy OreImo except lolicon siscon hentai otaku? Who the fuck is going to buy K-On! except ronery NEETs? I LOVE the Monogatari Series - but who the fuck is going to buy that shit except social rejects? Real-life people do not act like the people in those shows.Real people do not say to their friends/rivals in love “hey, let’s take a shower together while I fondle your tits.” Real sisters do not fall in love with their oniichan desu~s after many sessions of counseling. I love the tsundere archetype, but a real-life tsundere is someone that nobody wants to be around because they treat other people like shit. I probably should devote an entire paragraph to lolis. (Most) people do not sexualize little girls, and in fact find the sexualization of of little girls to be repulsive. Why, then, are there so many lolis in anime? Because lolis represent a lot of things that a lot of men find desirable in women - innocence, petite bodies, cuteness in general. But for whatever reason, it has become not only okay, but the norm for anime to have prepubescent girls in compromising sexual positions. If you like flat chests - fine. If you like inexperienced girls - fine. If you like cute things - fine. Mashing all of those things together on a 12-year-old and slapping a bikini on her to appeal to otaku with those preferences? Most people will say that is fucked up. Fanservice is off-putting to a lot of people. Incest is off-putting to a lot of people. Lolis are off-putting to a lot of people. Unbelievable characters and character interactions are off-putting to a lot of people. But those things are things that self-proclaimed otaku audiences embrace, so that’s what the Miyazaki-proclaimed otaku in the industry draw. Because animation studios make so little money off of anything but DVD and merchandise sales, and otaku are the only people who buy that stuff, the anime industry of late has become inbred and stale at best, and offensive and pedophilic at worst. Miyazaki is well-loved, both in the West and in the East. But he is not well-loved because his works are made for otaku. I’ve never seen anything he’s made, but the sense I get is that he’s loved in the mainstream because he tells stories that resonate with a hell of a lot of people. The problem he sees in the anime industry is that their works tend only to resonate with otaku, and otaku are not acceptable members of society in Japan. From what I’ve seen of what’s been released and been popular the past few years, I cannot blame him for thinking the way he does. Thank you so much for writing this so I don’t have to. It’s basically what Hideaki Anno of Evangelion fame also said: He loves anime, but he hates the main consumer of it, because they are too influential in what gets made. It only makes sense for Miyazaki to share this opinion: The man is passionate about his craft, and yet, when he checks any new anime season, he has to see his beloved art has turned into: Tons and tons of repetitive fanservice Harem Lolicon, siscon, incest, etc. Stereotypes that come again over and over. He is justifiably fed up with an industry that has shifted most of its focus to sell fap material like Super Sonico or lonely-wish-fulfilling shit like harem. It has become stagnant and fetid and you all should admit that already. Aaaaand also? As the person before me said, Otaku is a very, very negative term in Japan. It’s a huge insult. People that enjoy anime or manga in Japan without getting to depraved extremes of pursuing only their wish-fulfilling fetish ridden bullshit shows do exist, and they are not called otaku, nor would they EVER call themselves otaku. People that call themselves otaku in Japan do it to take a bit of the edge off the insult. You all oughta inform yourselves better and try to understand what Miyazaki and Anno have been trying to say for years instead of just diving into a cesspool of shit and calling it pristine water.
wagsman
Posted: 31670.5 hours ago
porto881: i made an informative flow chart since people still seem to have trouble with this concept
wagsman
Posted: 31742.3 hours ago
rhysiare: 30 days - 30 languages Our world is and has been home to thousands upon thousands of languages. This 30 days 30 languages blogpost project is to celebrate those languages that I personally find interesting, the commonplace ones and the more far-found, the extant and the extinct. Day 17 - Japanese Linguonym: Nihongo (日本語) Family: Non-Indo-European, Language Isolate (Japonic Family) Location: Japan (main) Status: Extant with ~125,000,000 speakers Personal Knowledge: Advanced Level A language that has taken the world by storm in the last century, Japanese is a powerhouse and well-recognised language. A perceived language isolate, Japanese presents a very unique language, and a very unique situation. Japanese isn’t entirely an isolate as Ryukyuan, the language spoken down in Okinawa is related to the overarching Japonic family, though mutually unintelligible. The origins of the Japanese language are a mystery overall, many linguists have tried to tie it into an overarching language group known as Altaic with which Korean, Mongolian, and Tungusic languages of Siberia have also been placed into, but the Altaic language family is hypothetical at best and not strong enough to be a solid concept, thus Japanese as with Korean stay as isolate languages. Japanese is a rather ancient language, with the earliest writings found dating back to the early 400s AD. The first written Japanese was written entirely in Chinese characters called kanji, being used for phonetic value as opposed to semantic value, the characters used in this method to write Old Japanese were known as man’yogana. Man’yogana remained the sole script of the language until about the Heian period around 800 AD when two shorthand and simplified versions of the Chinese characters developed into separate scripts. These more standard and shorter scripts are the basis of the modern Japanese alphabet so that now the Japanese language utilizes three scripts: hiragana (main standard), katakana (sub-standard), and kanji (intermittent). Hiragana is the main standard script of Japanese and is only representative of phonetic value, technically one could write every word in hiragana but as Japanese uses no spacing between words and there are many many many homonyms, that would prove difficult. Katakana is the sub-standard script, it is also representative of solely phonetic value and is used mostly for three reasonings: one, to separate foreign words from traditionally Japanese words, two, to imply emphasis on some word or provide some instructive messages like in computerized messages or written-out phone numbers, and three, to write words which contain outdated kanji (hiragana is also used for this at times). As the Japanese language is moraic, meaning all sounds are formed in a consonant-vowel syllable paradigm like ‘ka” ‘ni’ ‘mu’ ‘ge’ or a lone vowel paradigm like ‘a’ ‘u’ ‘o’ or the syllabified ‘n’, the Japanese language does not contain consonant clusters like in English with words like ‘demonstrate’ or ‘complex’. Thus, the Japanese syllabary scripts of hiragana and katakana reflect the moraic structure of the language with both scripts each consisting of 46 characters representing this pattern. The last script of Japanese, kanji is a landmark of tradition, signifying some phonetic value but moreover being used for their semantic value (people debate this highly however). As Japanese script uses no spaces, kanji help to break words apart and provide guided reading. However, kanji characters suffer from being incredibly complex in having multiple phonetic readings for each one. Each kanji usually has at least one Chinese-based phonetic reading and one Japanese-based phonetic reading, and while some contain only one reading period, many kanji contain anywhere from 3 to 5 or more of Chinese and Japanese phonetic readings. This phenomenon stems from the importation of kanji for man’yogana as the Chinese language gave Japanese many new words for concepts which had no word in Japanese. In the past century, councils concerning the language have tried establish a regular-use kanji list to curb the number of kanji required for a literacy standard in the language down to about 2,000. However, this initiative has proved rather unsuccessful as many lesser used kanji in typical writing are still used in personal names and place names, and thus the average kanji needed to know still range around 5,000. However, official documents and journalistic publications such as magazines, newspapers, are regulated to fall in line with the standard set by the regular-use list for the most part. Japanese phonology consists of only 5 vowels, and roughly 22 consonantal sounds, the language does not contain diphthongs. Some interesting sounds to note are the ɸ sound which is almost like an F-sound, but made by blowing air between slightly closed lips, not with the top teeth on the bottom lip, and the ɯ vowel which is like making a U-sound like boot in English but not rounding the lips. Japanese also regularly engages in elision of its ɯ and sometimes i sound, so the sounds can often be eliminated or severely muted in normal speech. For example for the elision of ɯ, ikimasu (行きます) which means “(I) go” will often come off sounding like ikimas, and for the elision of i, ashita (明日) which means “tomorrow” will often come off sounding like ashta. Japanese engages in certain voicing patterns with consonants when a word is submitted to compounding, this can occur on all voiceless consonants, so for example kami (紙) means paper, but the word for a letter like one receives in the mail is tegami (手紙) with the first consonant of kami becoming voiced to enable the compounding of the words te (hand) and kami (paper). Gemination or the gliding of one consonant sound into another sometimes occurs on the ku and tsu morae, so a compound like kokki (国旗) “national flag” comes from the merging of koku (国) the Chinese-reading of the kanji that means country, with ki (旗) the Chinese-reading of the kanji that means flag, producing kokki by gemination instead of kokuki. Japanese word-order is typically subject-object-verb, but the language engages in the use of topics, meaning the main topic of the sentence is sometimes separate from the subject of the sentence’s action. Japanese also distinguishes its parts of speech through the use of particles, not case markings like in Romance languages or English. Typical particles are ‘ga’ (が) which marks a subject, ‘o’ (を) which marks a direct object, ‘ni’ (に) which marks an indirect object, ‘wa’ (は) which marks a topic, ‘de’ (で) which marks a locative, “no” (の) which marks possessive from the noun preceding it, kind of like ‘s in English, and ‘to’ (と) which marks instrumentive and comitative. Note that particle ‘o’ is written with the ‘wo’ character, this character is never pronounced with a W-sound, also the particle ‘wa’ is written with the ‘ha’ character, yet it is pronounced ‘wa’ in this circumstance. Regarding the use of topics and particles, an example sentence would be: zō wa hana ga nagai (象は鼻が長い) meaning “elephants have long noses” with a literal breakdown making elephants ‘zō’ the topic of the sentence with ‘wa’ as the corresponding particle, then nose ‘hana’ is the subject being marked by corresponding particle ‘ga’, perhaps an easier reading for topic-contained sentences would be to read the topic like this…”As for elephants, (their) noses are long”. Japanese is a highly contextual language, and as such, pronouns are often eliminated based on understanding the context of the sentence/phrase. This can be very confusing as neither adjectives nor verbs are marked to portray the speaker. Unlike in pronoun-drop languages like Spanish where ‘(yo) estoy felíz’, “yo” is dropped because “estoy” can only be used with the first-person singular anyway, Japanese verbs are not marked for person and in example, mimasu (見ます) can mean I/you/he/she/it/we/they see(s). The general understanding is that a verb or adjective will relate back to the speaker, unless otherwise noted by the use of a topic or distinguished subject particle. Japanese also is slightly irregular in that adjectives and nouns can sometimes be self-contained, such as atsui (暑い) can mean ‘hot’ or ‘am/is/are hot’, so one can say sono osara wa atsui (そのお皿は暑い) which would mean ‘that plate is hot’ despite the sentence containing no verb at all. Japanese distinguishes between casual and polite formal speech/writing in varying usage of nouns and verbal/adjectival inflection, casual speech makes use of shorter minimally-inflected speech, while formal speech makes use of longer heavily-inflected forms. Example: I read this book can be kono hon o yonda (この本を読んだ) in the casual, or kono hon o yomimashita (この本を読みました) in the formal, note that in both sentences, a pronoun is not directly used yet implied by contextual matters, also note that formal and polite speech has extremely varying levels and forms, this is only one of them. Some nouns also incorporate normal and formal forms, noting that the formal forms of a noun almost never refers to one’s own ownership or usage of the noun but naturally there are exceptions, for example: tegami (手紙) a written letter can be anyone’s letter even one’s own, but otegami (お手紙) can only refer to someone else’s letter or a letter that you have received but you are referring about the author who has written it. Japanese also rarely distinguishes plurals directly on its nouns, if so, it is typically done by use of outside words referring to number or amount. Speaking of numbers, when referring to a number when used with a noun, Japanese uses a term called a classifier, this means the number is paired with an identifier relating to the noun in question, for example how in English we say: two sheets of paper and not two papers (usually). Japanese classifiers are various and many, so some common ones to see are -hon (本) used for long, thin objects like pencils, flowers, foods on a kebab, -satsu (冊) used for books and magazines, -mai (枚) used for flat, thin objects, -nin (人) used for people, but note it has different forms for one person and two persons, -ko (個) used for small objects like a piece of candy, -hiki (匹) used for animals, note this varies depending on animal, -dai (台) used for machines, and -tsu (つ) used as the general basic. So to refer to two sheets of paper you’d say nimai (二枚). The Japanese language is strangely lacking in many words for body parts, though lately has begun creating them, yet they are inundated with a variety of nature terms. In fact for many years, the word for hand and arm were one and the same, and the word for leg and foot are actually still the same pronunciation-wise, they only use different kanji. The word for blue in Japanese actually applies to both the colours blue and green, while a distinctive word for green is now used to separate the idea; the word for blue can still be seen in many situations meaning green, for example aoi (青い) “blue” is still used to describe green traffic lights. In terms of people, unless being general, referring to someone as simply the word for man otoko (男) or woman onna (女) is seen as rude, instead words like otoko no hito (男の人) literally ‘man person’ and onna no hito (女の人) literally ‘woman person’ as well as danshi (男子) hard to translate indefinitely but sort of like “gentleman” and joshi (女子) sort of like “lady” are also used. Lastly, Japanese incorporates many foreign-originating words into its language, yet due to the limited phonemic system of Japanese, these words are modified into the sound structure of the language, often creating neologisms unique to the Japanese language and at times changing the original meaning of the word. For example, hai-tenshon (ハイテンション) coming from English loanwords “high” and “tension” which in English would imply a situation that is awkward, uncomfortable, and potentially dangerous, but in Japanese the meaning has been changed to mean a situation where people are high-energy, excited, and enthusiastic to the point of being hyper. Some words in Japanese… ishi (石) – stone tomodachi (友だち) – friend kokoro (心) – heart (in the sense of being the seat of emotions) shinzō (心臓) – heart (in the sense of the anatomical organ) midori (緑) – green (distinctively) umi (海) – sea/ocean tsuki (月) – moon/month mado (窓) – window tsurugi (剣) – sword yume (夢) – dream kibō (希望) – hope hoshi (星) – star shiro (城) – castle ai (愛) – love (all senses and being in love) koi (恋) – love (romantic senses and falling in love) kuma (熊) – bear gengo (言語) - language Nihon (日本) – Japan Nihonjin (日本人) – Japanese person Nihongo (日本語) – Japanese language Nihongo o hanasemasu (日本語を話せます) – I speak Japanese, lit. I can speak Japanese ~to mōshimasu (~と申します) - My name is~, lit. I am called~ Japanese is a language on a fast path in our modern technological and internationally interactive world. Renown for its poetic nature, cultural expression, and modern presence, Japanese is a language very influential. With more and more expression and outpouring of Japanese culture and language unto modern societies on a global scale, it is a unique and useful language to learn, if you’re interested, check it out sometime… Check here for more… Be sure to check out the 30 Days 30 Languages Masterpost to catch all of the languages and the updates for future ones in this series. [Day 16: Albanian] - 30 Days, 30 Languages - [Day 18: French] I feel the need to remind whoever is following me for whatever reason you may be following me: I am a linguist and an otaku with a growing fascination of Japanese. Other than that I’m a fairly boring person, tumblr-wise.
wagsman
Posted: 32776.0 hours ago
funtimesayshi: astraedm: inlikealioness: tsamthepoet: The app is called ‘PhotoMath’. Reblog to save a life OH MY GOD tfw no android release yet But can it do calculus?
wagsman
Posted: 33049.9 hours ago
nprglobalhealth: How Do You Catch Ebola: By Air, Sweat Or Water? There’s no question Ebola is one of the most terrifying diseases out there. It causes a painful death, typically kills more than 50 percent of those infected and essentially has no cure. But if you compare how contagious the Ebola virus is to, say SARS or the measles, Ebola just doesn’t stack up. In fact, the virus is harder to catch than the common cold. That’s because there has been no evidence that Ebola spreads between people through the air. Health experts repeatedly emphasize that human-to-human transmission requires direct contact with infected bodily fluids, including blood, vomit and feces. And to infect, those fluids have to reach a break in the skin or the mucous membranes found around your eyes, mouth and nose. But that hasn’t stopped two-thirds of Americans from thinking that the virus spreads “easily,” a poll from Harvard School of Public Health found in August. Almost 40 percent of the 1,025 people surveyed said they worry about an Ebola epidemic in the U.S. More than a quarter were concerned about catching the virus themselves. Many questions still linger. Is Ebola really not airborne? Can it spread through contaminated water? What about through a drop of blood left behind on a table? So we took those questions to two virologists: Alan Schmaljohn at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Jean-Paul Gonzalez at Metabiota, a company that tracks global infectious diseases. Continue reading. Photo: A burial team in Barkedu, Liberia, buries their protective clothing alongside the body of an Ebola victim. It’s possible to catch the virus from clothing soiled by infected blood or other bodily fluids. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR) If only I could Getty family to read this.
wagsman
Posted: 33102.7 hours ago
futuristech-info: Six reputable 3rd party researchers verify the new E-Cat cold fusion reactor is legitimate By Sebastian Anthony - Andrea Rossi’s E-Cat — the device that purports to use cold fusion to generate massive amounts of cheap, green energy – has been verified by third-party researchers, according to a new 54-page report. The researchers observed a small E-Cat over 32 days, where it produced net energy of 1.5 megawatt-hours, or “far more than can be obtained from any known chemical sources in the small reactor volume.” READ MORE ON EXTREME TECH READ THE FULL REPORT - Observation of abundant heat production from a reactor device and of isotopic changes in the fuel (PDF) This is the kind of thing I used to read about as a kid.
wagsman
Posted: 33952.8 hours ago
mylifeiscorgisandnetflix: If u were havin a bad day, here are some otters Otters are my favorite thing.